Poem from Slate: “This Horse”

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This week’s featured poem from Slate is entitled This Horse and it’s written by Rebekah Stout. As always, I’d recommend heading over to the Slate poem page and listening to the audio version of this poem. Not only is it a great experience to hear poetry read aloud, it’s especially awesome to hear it read by its author. So take some time to check out This Horse and hear it read by Rebekah Stout.

Rebekah Stout, according to this creative writing journal, Rebekah Stout (Poetry 2010) is the assistant poetry editor at Slate and a lecturer in poetry at Boston University. She won the 2009 Poetry International Prize, and her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Slate, Salmagundi, and Poetry International.

This Horse, by Rebekah Stout

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Slate Poem: “The Escape Artist”

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This week’s featured poem from Slate is entitled The Escape Artist and it’s written by David Lehman. As always, here is a friendly reminder that Slate offers you an audio version of their featured poem read by the actual poet! I think this is pretty special and everyone could use some poetry in their day. So why not take a few moments and listen to Lehman read his poem?

According to his webpage on Poets.org, David Lehman has written many collections of poetry. His books include When a Woman Loves a Man (Scribner, 2005), The Evening Sun (2002), Operation Memory (1990), and An Alternative to Speech (1986). He is also series editor of The Best American Poetry, which he initiated in 1988, and is general editor of the University of Michigan Press’s Poets on Poetry Series. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Ingram Merrill Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. He is on the core faculty of the graduate writing programs at the New School and New York University.

The Escape Artistby David Lehman

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Poem from Slate: “How to Steal the Laptop of Your Childhood Nemesis”

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This week’s poem from Slate is entitled, rather interestingly, How to Steal the Laptop of Your Childhood Nemesisand it is written by poet Eric McHenry. As always, you can click the poem title there and hear Eric McHenry read his poem aloud, which I think is a really awesome thing. If you have a spare moment today, do check this out and add a little poetry to your day.

According to a website about Kansas poets, Eric McHenry is the author of Potscrubber Lullabies (Waywiser Press, 2006), a poetry collection that won the Kate Tufts Discovery Award. His poetry has appeared in The New Republic, Harvard Review, Northwest Review, Orion and Agni.  He currently teaches at Washburn University. At that website, you can also find some more examples of McHenry’s poems.

How to Steal the Laptop of Your Childhood Nemesisby Eric McHenry

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Poem from Slate: Terri Witek

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This week’s featured poem from Slate is entitled Tomorrow Night, Shake Me and is written by Terri Witek. As always, I want to encourage all of the blog readers to head over to Slate (just click the poem title here) to listen to Terri Witek read her poem aloud. As I’m sure you’re tired of hearing me say, hearing a poem read aloud by its author is an important thing to experience. So be sure to check that out.

Terri Witek, according to her website, has written several books to date. These include Exit Island (2012), The Shipwreck Dress (2008) — a Florida Book Award winner — and Robert Lowell and LIFE STUDIES: Revising the Self (1993). She currently teaches English at Stetson University, where she holds the Sullivan Chair in Creative Writing.

Tomorrow Night, Shake Meby Terri Witek

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Poem from Slate: “Distant Wants”

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Good morning, blog readers! This week’s featured poem from Slate is entitled Distant Wants and it’s written by Jeffrey Skinner. As always, Slate offers you guys an audio version of the poem, which is made more special by the fact that poem is read by its author. I highly recommend checking it out, it’s always awesome to hear a poem read by its author. Add a little poetry to your day!

According to his website, Jeffrey Skinner has published five collections of poetry: Late Stars, A Guide to Forgetting, The Company of Heaven, Gender Studies, and Salt Water Amnesia, his most recent, published in 2005 by Ausable Press. His poems have appeared in numerous publications, such as The New YorkerThe AtlanticThe Nation, and The American Poetry Review. He has been awarded residencies at Yaddo, McDowell, and the Fine Arts Center in Provincetown. His work has been featured numerous times on National Public Radio and is co-founder and editorial consultant for Sarabande Books.

Distant Wants, by Jeffrey Skinner

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Poem from Slate: Dean Young

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This week’s featured poem from Slate is entitled Upon Hearing of Another Marriage Breaking Up and is written by Dean Young. When I saw the author of this week’s poem, I had a feeling I’d seen his work before. Sure enough, his poem How to Glow was featured a few months ago. If you’d like to read more about that poem, click here. This week, as always, be sure to head over to Slate’s arts page to hear Dean Young read his poem aloud.

According to the Poetry Foundation, Dean Young has written many collections of poetry including Strike Anywhere (1995), winner of the Colorado Prize for Poetry; Skid (2002), finalist for the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize; and Primitive Mentor (2008), shortlisted for the International Griffin Poetry Prize.  He has also written a book on poetics, The Art of Recklessness: Poetry as Assertive Force and Contradiction (2010). Young has taught at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, the low-residency MFA program at Warren Wilson College, and the University of Texas-Austin where he holds the William Livingston Chair of Poetry.

Upon Hearing of Another Marriage Breaking Up, by Dean Young

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Poem from Slate: “History”

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This week’s featured poem from Slate is entitled History and is written by Angie Estes. As always, I’d like to encourage you all to check out the audio version of this poem, as read by Angie Estes on the Slate arts webpage. This poem in particular has some great images and truly evocative language, so check it out!

According to the bio on her website, Angie Estes has been published very widely in her career. She is the author of four books, the most recent one being Tryst (Oberlin College Press, 2009), which was selected as one of two finalists for the 2010 Pulitzer Prize. Her first book, The Uses of Passion (1995), was the winner of the Peregrine Smith Poetry Prize. Her poems have appeared in many literary magazines such as The Paris ReviewPloughsharesand Boston Review. Her essays have appeared in FIELD, Lyric Poetry Review, and Little Women: Norton Critical Edition. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize, and many grants and residencies. She is on the faculty of Ashland University’s low residency MFA program.

History, by Angie Estes

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