Sylvia’s Psychological Summaries: The Tattooist of Auschwitz

There’s something that I wanted to get off of my chest before I start talking about the book for this week’s blog. Recently, the second season of Bridgerton dropped and yes, of course, I binged it within the first two days of it showing up on Netflix. With that being said, I was HIGHLY disappointed in the second season. After reading the book, there was no way that I could enjoy this new season because it was almost completely different from the book. To say I was disappointed is an understatement…I still have faith though! I’m a die-hard Bridgerton fan and I am extremely hopeful that the third season will follow the book’s plotline because the books are PHENOMENAL. Anyways, to get back to my blog, I wanted to warn you that this one is going to be a little bit different than what I typically write about. Is it still a romance novel? There’s a sprinkle of that but the main genre is historical fiction that is based on one of the darkest times of human history; the holocaust. Many people in Ukraine are currently living through a similar type of hell and I wanted to address this because it is barbaric and hits a little too close to home. The way Russia attacked Ukraine and the types of war crimes they are committing in Ukraine right now are frighteningly similar to what Hitler did to Poland (my family’s home country) and MANY other countries/people during World War II. If you are not up-to-date on what is currently happening in Ukraine and you don’t know much about World War II, you need to educate yourself and not just turn a blind eye to it. Now, on to my blog. 

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Sylvia’s Psychological Summaries: The Goddess Test by Aimee Carter

So far, I’ve been struggling to pick a book to write about for each blog. My first blog was easy because I recently read the book that I wrote about but I quickly realized that I’ve been slacking in the reading department. I had always thought that I was an avid reader and that I read a good amount of books but starting I quickly saw the opposite. When I look at my bookshelf, I see books that I’ve had since middle school as well as a handful of books that I’ve read throughout college. During quarantine, we all had a lot of free time on our hands so I read more often but I only re-read books. I do the same thing with tv-shows; when I know what will happen, it eases my anxiety which is why I think I re-read books. To circle back to why I’m even talking about this, the book I decided to write about in this week’s blog was one of those books that I re-read during quarantine. I first heard about it when I was in high school and was instantly obsessed with it. It contained a combination of two things that I loved to read about – romance and Greek mythology. From as far back as I can remember, I’ve always been extremely interested in Greek Mythology so, naturally, I’ve read the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series about a hundred times as well as The Heros of Olympus series. I also dabbled in Egyptian and Roman mythology for a while. Along with that, I remember even creating my free website when I was in sixth grade that was strictly based on Greek mythology (I’m cringing internally) so when I heard about The Goddess Test by Aimee Carter, I knew I had to buy the whole series and binge-read it.

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Sylvia’s Psychological Summaries: Waterfall by Lisa Bergren

Hey everyone! I hope you guys have been doing well and if this is your second time reading my blog, welcome! If this is your first time, I’m happy you’re here and that you’re curious about psychology. This week I’m going to be diving into an interesting aspect of how faith and psychology interact with each other. I grew up in the Roman Catholic faith and am still very involved in it and I truly believe in it as well so, like psychology, this topic is very important to me and something that I enjoy writing about. Before you get scared and run away, I promise that this isn’t going to be another theology class but more of an outside observation that connects to the main theme of Waterfall by Lisa Bergren, so hear me out. Psychology and the Catholic faith seem to mix like oil and water -not at all. This was something that I struggled with at times while studying psychology in school. On one end, I was hearing words like “self-sacrifice” and “self-denial” and that if someone slapped my face, I should offer them the other cheek. And on the other hand, I was learning about “self-actualization” and “self-fulfillment” and how I have to focus on myself. Needless to say, I was very confused at times about what I should be thinking and feeling and I’m sure that others who have grown up in religious households feel the same way. The reason I started thinking about this was that I was trying to figure out what book I should write about next. I didn’t want it to be another “Cinderella story”; I wanted it to have a little bit more substance so I thought of the book Waterfall

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Sylvia’s Psychological Summaries: Bridgerton

Before I started writing this blog post, I was freaking out because I hadn’t read any “intellectual” books lately; only sappy Julia Quinn novels (yes, I’m obsessed with Bridgerton, and yes, of course, I’m going to The Queen’s Ball: A Bridgerton Experience). But after thinking about it for a while, I decided to just be authentic and write about what I do know – and that’s sappy romance novels. I’ll switch it up a bit as time goes on and I get more comfortable with blogging/writing in general, but for now, you’ll just have to bear with romance and Jane Austen references. For those of you who are currently reading the Bridgerton series beware because there may be slight spoilers but if you’re like me and read the last page/chapter of a book first, then by all means, welcome.

To give a little preface as to what exactly will be going on in my blog posts, the first bit will be a short lesson on what psychology in literature is exactly. The word “literature” comes with multiple definitions. The most basic definition that shows up when you toss “literature” into Google search is, “written works, especially those considered of superior or lasting artistic merit.” While this definition is completely acceptable, it doesn’t convey the feelings you’re supposed to have after reading a really good book. If you dig a little deeper, however, you find a second definition that defines literature as, “a record of human consciousness,” the richest and most comprehensive we have.

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