Student Double Feature: Courtney Dial and Ahimme Cazarez Review Jennifer Kent’s “The Babadook”

Below are two Lewis University students’ perspectives on the 2014 horror film The Babadook.

Courtney Dial:

http://bit.ly/2oaqnnJ

Raw, creepy, and thought provoking: The Babadook is designed to give the viewer an inside perspective on what depression feels and looks like, and it succeeds. In The Babadook, there is no romanticizing this disease, which is cleverly disguised as Mister Babadook. Jennifer Kent’s first feature-length film was not wasted with this incredible picture. Beautiful cinematography and allegorical expression are used brilliantly to cover a subject that is sometimes kept in the basement, under lock and key.

We are introduced to Amelia Vannick (Essie Davis) and her son Samuel (Noah Wiseman), and instantaneously, due to the superb misè-en-scene, it is painfully obvious that this is a tense household. The feelings that are presented through the use of these elements give such believable verisimilitude that it is hard not to imagine yourself in Amelia’s situation.

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Student Feature: Heather Ray and Courtney Dial Review Ti West’s Retro Classic “The House of the Devil”

Below are two Lewis University students’ perspectives on the 2009 horror film The House of the Devil.

Heather Ray:

Get Your Paper Bags Ready

http://bit.ly/2nuGu1O

House of the Devil takes you on an emotional rollercoaster from beginning to end. You start by comfortably strapping into the relatable college environment, listening to the deafening, upbeat ’80s soundtrack, and awaiting the thrill. Once you’re secure and devoted without an exit, you begin by slowly traveling into heightened suspense and elevated anxiety as you become aware of the climactic drop that is inevitably in front of you. Once you reach the top, you get a few short moments to gasp and take your last breath before you’re consumed by the full-speed terror, teased without knowing what twists and turns may come next. Finally, you’re abruptly halted as the ride has come to a stop.

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Artist’s Portfolio: Larissa Barnat

Found below is a collection of stunning art from Larissa Barnat, a Lewis University student we’re incredibly happy to feature here. The series, entitled “Disorientation,” effectively shows off her vast talent. We’ve interlaced Larissa’s bio and process piece between the ten hand-picked oil paintings we’ve highlighted in this post. See for yourself the wonderful artistry of this young talent.

Larissa Barnat
Larissa Barnat

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Artist’s Portfolio: Alex Turner

Found below is a collection of intriguing and enveloping paintings by Lewis University student Alex Turner. We’re ecstatic to feature his nine paintings, which we’ve interspersed throughout this post along with Turner’s bio and process piece.
Discover for yourself the awesome work of this young artist.

Alex Turner
Alex Turner

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Artist’s Portfolio: Mervyn John

Found below is a collection of the vibrant, brilliant photography of Mervyn John, a Lewis University student we’re incredibly happy to feature here. We’ve interlaced John’s bio and process piece between the eight hand-picked photographs we’ve highlighted in this post. See for yourself the stunning artistry of this young talent.

Mervyn John
Mervyn John

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Student Feature: Two Reflections on the Cinematic Masterpiece, “City of God”

Below are two student’s perspectives on the 2002 film City of God.

Reno Stramaglia

http://bit.ly/1LfkVZp
http://bit.ly/1LfkVZp

Fernando Meirelles’ 2002 film, City of God, is a work of art that is full of realistic depictions of the violence and drama associated with the impoverished favelas in Cidade de Deus during the 1970s. By utilizing the viewpoint of a young photographer (known as “Rocket”), this film immerses the audience within a story that needed to be told.

Based on a true story, Rocket experiences how the early influence of “Robin Hood-like” gangsters caused the growth of dark lawlessness and corruption within this Brazilian city. Although his peers and older brother, Goose, surrender to criminal activity in order to survive, Rocket struggles to avoid these temptations of misdeed. It is the sociopath, Li’l Zé, who leads the mayhem of murder and crime that takes place within the neighborhood. This film utilizes a wide variety of unique cinematographic techniques in order to convey the truth behind the activities of these gangsters.

Meirelles’ use of fast editing within the film helps to display the true nature of Rocket’s environment. From shot to shot, events happen in a fast-paced manner. Cutting to different depictions of violence within a small amount of time causes the audience to fully experience the chaotic environment. Life is hectic and stressful within these slums. Meirelles utilizes classical cutting in order to help the audience to understand this different way of living. In addition, music in this film acts in a similar manner. The fast rhythm suits the rapid depictions of action within the slums. The choice of music also acts to paint a picture of the Brazilian culture while providing the film with surge of energy to keep the audience on their feet.

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Selections from Samantha Gennett’s chapbook, “Pomegranate”

Cover to Sam Gennett's chapbook, "Pomegranate"
Inside cover to Sam Gennett’s chapbook, “Pomegranate”

The following three poems were hand-picked by Samantha Gennett, showcasing the talent found in her recent chapbook, Pomegranate.


Incident

We sit together, you reclined and I upright, enveloped
by the nicotine you transmit. As you inhale, I stare at the orange
glow at your cigarette end. You look at me with a telescopic
grin, shaking your head, not even noticing the ash singeing

a hole through your Nirvana t-shirt, hair resembling elephant eyelashes,
lips shining pizza grease and I cannot think of a way to rewire
your melancholy or find a way to sew a mustache
onto your numb smile. This smoke, strangling our throats—is there a fire?

We sit together in this chain-smoked cloud, I underhand
toss you an aging baseball but your hand cannot render
the shape of catch, instead your body lays contorted like an ampersand
and all I can do is mumble “it’s okay, you’re okay” tenderly.

I have never seen anything less photogenic:
foam bubbles out of your mouth, white as pith of pomegranate.

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