Student Feature: An Intergalactic Road Trip for the Ages – A Review of “Thor: Ragnarok”

Below is a review of the recently-released Thor: Ragnarok, written by Lewis University student Jerry Langosch. 

http://imdb.to/2cktPWF

Since 2008 with the release of Iron Man, Marvel Studios have been, like clockwork, pumping out energetic, focused films in their Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). They tell the tales of their plethora of superheroes and villains to the tune of millions of dollars in production costs, but billions in return from the box office, with 2012’s The Avengers being the shining star (making $1.5 billion on a $220 million budget). The Thor franchise, though, sticks out from the most from the bunch, as it is rooted in real Norse mythology. And though it is a tall order to hand over such material so heavily-rooted in mythology to any filmmaker, Marvel’s decision to put New Zealand’s Taika Waititi behind the third entry in this series is, astonishingly, the best move that the company has made in tapping directorial talent to date.

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Student Feature: Roundtable Reviews of “Searching for Sugar Man”

Found below are four reviews of the the 2012 Oscar-winning documentary, Searching for Sugar Man, written by Lewis University students Cynthia Saucedo, Andrea Ecarma, Star Quiroz, Jerry Langosch.

*Spoilers ahead*

Cynthia Saucedo:

http://bit.ly/2gekr8X

Searching for Sugar Man: A Modern Fairy Tale

Searching for Sugar Man (2012), directed by the late Malik Bendjelloul, tells a story that would be considered a modern fairy tale. Rodriguez is introduced as a mystery, untraceable man, and a prophet. The film’s mystery is built-up by using low-key lighting, shadows, and foggy images. Furthermore, when sound is utilized, it creates an eerie feeling and generates excitement, while the lack of sound highlights the importance of a scene. Playing Rodriguez’s actual soundtrack makes the audience recognize the true beauty in his music and leads them to wonder why he never made it in the music industry.

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Student Feature: The Cycle of Violence in “City of God”

http://bit.ly/2ff77RL

Below is a notable perspective on the 2002 film City of God, written by Lewis University student Sarah Simar. Spoilers ahead.

Guns, gangs, crime, drugs, power, wealth, survival — these are the most obvious themes in City of God (Cidade de Deus, 2002), directed by Fernando Meirelles and Kátia Lund. There is no way out, no safe place to hide in the City of God. If you are not in a gang, you are forced into one at a very young age.

One of the main characters and narrator of the story, Rocket (Alexandre Rodrigues), dreams of being a photographer and getting out of this violent world. The other main character, Ze Pequeno (Leandro Firmino), wants to rule the city from a young age with his partner Benny (Phellipe Haagensen), and accomplishes just that through a series of malicious acts. Rocket and Ze are so radically different, but their paths cross more than once throughout the movie. These moments reiterate the theme that there is no way out, even for Rocket, who wants nothing to do with any gang.

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Student Double Feature: Courtney Dial and Ahimme Cazarez Review Jennifer Kent’s “The Babadook”

Below are two Lewis University students’ perspectives on the 2014 horror film The Babadook.

Courtney Dial:
You can also visit Courtney’s own blog at Horror Film Mondays.

http://bit.ly/2oaqnnJ

Raw, creepy, and thought-provoking: The Babadook is designed to give the viewer an inside perspective on what depression feels and looks like, and it succeeds. In The Babadook, there is no romanticizing this disease, which is cleverly disguised as Mister Babadook. Jennifer Kent’s first feature-length film was not wasted with this incredible picture. Beautiful cinematography and allegorical expression are used brilliantly to cover a subject that is sometimes kept in the basement, under lock and key.

We are introduced to Amelia Vannick (Essie Davis) and her son Samuel (Noah Wiseman), and instantaneously, due to the superb misè-en-scene, it is painfully obvious that this is a tense household. The feelings that are presented through the use of these elements give such believable verisimilitude that it is hard not to imagine yourself in Amelia’s situation.

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Student Feature: Heather Ray and Courtney Dial Review Ti West’s Retro Classic “The House of the Devil”

Below are two Lewis University students’ perspectives on the 2009 horror film The House of the Devil.

Heather Ray:

Get Your Paper Bags Ready

http://bit.ly/2nuGu1O

House of the Devil takes you on an emotional rollercoaster from beginning to end. You start by comfortably strapping into the relatable college environment, listening to the deafening, upbeat ’80s soundtrack, and awaiting the thrill. Once you’re secure and devoted without an exit, you begin by slowly traveling into heightened suspense and elevated anxiety as you become aware of the climactic drop that is inevitably in front of you. Once you reach the top, you get a few short moments to gasp and take your last breath before you’re consumed by the full-speed terror, teased without knowing what twists and turns may come next. Finally, you’re abruptly halted as the ride has come to a stop.

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Artist’s Portfolio: Larissa Barnat

Found below is a collection of stunning art from Larissa Barnat, a Lewis University student we’re incredibly happy to feature here. The series, entitled “Disorientation,” effectively shows off her vast talent. We’ve interlaced Larissa’s bio and process piece between the ten hand-picked oil paintings we’ve highlighted in this post. See for yourself the wonderful artistry of this young talent.

Larissa Barnat
Larissa Barnat

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Artist’s Portfolio: Alex Turner

Found below is a collection of intriguing and enveloping paintings by Lewis University student Alex Turner. We’re ecstatic to feature his nine paintings, which we’ve interspersed throughout this post along with Turner’s bio and process piece.
Discover for yourself the awesome work of this young artist.

Alex Turner
Alex Turner

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