Jet Fuel Jukebox for 4/25/17

The day you’ve waited for eagerly has finally come! It’s Tuesday, and with that comes a brand new entry in our Jet Fuel Jukebox series.

I didn’t find a single new song this past week to share, unfortunately, but I did have the pleasure of seeing Donnie Darko in theaters for its 15th anniversary this past weekend! Being set in the 80’s and featuring an incredible, decade-appropriate soundtrack, the film has inspired me to reach into the time period for my picks this week.

Jake didn’t seem to run into the same problem as me, as he’s included several brand new singles, including the 80’s-inspired Paramore hit “Hard Times,” and the new song from Lana Del Rey and The Weeknd. Rounding out the playlist are tracks from Tears For Fears, Sonic Youth, and Katy Perry.

— Michael Lane, Blog Editor

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Editor’s Notes #191

Image source: http://editorialiste.blogspot.com

Hello, blog readers! I hope that spring weather has come to you wherever you live. Good news: Issue #13 of the Jet Fuel Review is on its way! In the meantime, I encourage you to check out the Review website for some announcements. While you’re there, be sure to check out our previous issues as well. Now let’s check in with the blog!

If you’re looking for some new music to listen to, or if you just need a playlist for your daily routine, look no further than the Jet Fuel Jukebox! There are three new playlists for you check out!

If comics are more your speed, we’ve got you covered. Be sure to check out the two new posts from Quinn Stratton, each of which reviews a title from Junji Ito. In these recent posts, Quinn reviews Uzumaki and Gyo.

Of course, we’ve got tons of film content on the blog this month. Our Casual Critics reviewed the documentary Searching for Sugarman. You can check out two perspectives on the film — one from Reno Stramaglia, and one from Donatas Ružys. Recently, Michael Lane reviewed two new movies. Be sure to check out his thoughts on The Belko Experiment and The Fate of the Furious.

In addition, our managing editor — Sam Gennett — weighed in on The House of the Devil, a film that some editors reviewed a few weeks ago. You can also read a new review of The Babadook from two Lewis U students — Courtney Dial and Ahimme Cazarez.

Finally, if you’re looking for some book recommendations, be sure to check out the new posts in Sabrina’s Book Corner. Lately, she has reviewed As You Wish by Jackson Pearce, Along for the Ride by Sarah Dessen, and The Remedy by Suzanne Young.

Until next time, keep an eye out for more updates to the blog!

— Jet Fuel Blog Editor, Mary Egan

Sabrina’s Book Corner: Identity Confusion

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Hello, and welcome back to Sabrina’s Book Corner! This week we are going to be discussing The Remedy by Suzanne Young.

The Remedy tells the story of Quinlan McKee. Quinlan is a closer, which means she works closely with grief therapists to help families struggling with the death of a loved one. Closers have the responsibility of easing families’ grief by briefly “becoming” their deceased loved one.

Closers are not perfect copies of the deceased loved on, but they wear the deceased’s clothes, change their hair accordingly, and study the deceased person’s personality so they can “become” them and give the families the chance to say goodbye.

Quinlan has been a closer since she was seven years old. Now, at seventeen, she is having difficuly distinguishing between her memories and the memories of those she has portrayed.

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Family Still Comes First: A Review of “The Fate of the Furious”

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Over the past several weeks, I embarked on a cinematic journey through the Fast and Furious franchise, watching them in order, each for the very first time. It’s not a perfect series by any means, but I fell deeply in love, especially as the series progressed and switched from being prominently about street racing to being big-budget action capers, becoming all the more ridiculous and over-the-top in all the best ways. Despite what you might expect from an eighth entry in a franchise, with The Fate of the Furious, Vin Diesel and his family of street-racers-turned-government-agents still manage to up the ante and deliver one of the absolute best movies in the series.

F8 picks up with an opening scene that calls back to the good ol’ days of Fast & Furious (circa 2001-2006), complete with trash talking, street racing and a tropical pop hit setting the scene. Dom (Vin Diesel) has settled down in Havana with Letty (Michelle Rodriguez), but it isn’t long before he’s dragged back into the increasingly explosive life he’s lived for the past 16 years. What sets this entry apart from its seven predecessors, is that this time Dom’s playing for the wrong team, and betraying the family he loves. Gasp!

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Words an’ Pictures: Creeping Death Stench from the Depths of Humanity

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Greetings bores and ghouls! For this week’s installment, I’ve decided to continue in the same vein as my previous post and take a look at another one of Junji Ito’s fantastic yowl yarns, Gyo.

In Gyo, Junji Ito creates a landscape of terror that is much more rooted in recent history than the surreal nightmare portrayed in Uzumaki, making it a more traditional narrative, but also meaning it hits closer to home. I say traditional in a comparative sense, because although the main structure of Gyo’s plot is more conventional than that of Uzumaki, it is still very original.

Essentially, Gyo follows a young couple, Tadashi and Kaori, in a story that is similar to apocalyptic zombie tales, except that rather than simply using the living dead, Ito portrays rotting fish equipped with mechanical legs overrunning Japan. As bizarre as that may seem, it only gets stranger, as it is explained that what is actually going on beneath the surface is a viral plague in which the germs take control of host bodies, generate an odor close to that of rotting flesh, and then use the bodies as batteries to fuel their mechanical leg structures and further spread the plague (it goes even deeper, but I’ll leave that for you to find out).

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Jet Fuel Jukebox for 4/18/17

Imagine: it’s Tuesday, and you’re desperately searching for new music to listen to. If this is you, then you’ve come to the right place, as the Jet Fuel Jukebox has has all your music needs.

We were finally blessed this past weekend with Kendrick Lamar’s new album DAMN., and it’s damn good. So good, in fact, that both Jake and I have highlighted a track from the record. Other than Kendrick, we have highlights from the new Little Dragon full-length release, and tracks from Michael Jackson, The Cure, and Metric.

I also had the pleasure of seeing one of the final performances of pop duo Chairlift this past weekend, so I’ve concluded my half of the playlist with one of my favorite songs by them. R.I.P. Chairlift, you will be missed.

— Michael Lane, Blog Editor

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Sabrina’s Book Corner: Night Life

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Hello, and welcome back to Sabrina’s Book Corner! This week we are going to be discussing Along for the Ride by Sarah Dessen.

Along for the Ride tells the story of Auden West. Ever since Auden’s parents divorced when she was little, she has been an insomniac. It sounds bad, but never sleeping has its advantages, such as extra study time.

When her parents divorced, Auden threw herself into academics and became a mini-adult so that she would not cause her parents any trouble. Auden doesn’t mind that she seems to have missed out on all the joys of childhood, since she has her outstanding academic record and scholarship to college. Now, all Auden has to figure out is what she is going to do with her summer.

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