Poem from Slate: “History”

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This week’s featured poem from Slate is entitled History and is written by Angie Estes. As always, I’d like to encourage you all to check out the audio version of this poem, as read by Angie Estes on the Slate arts webpage. This poem in particular has some great images and truly evocative language, so check it out!

According to the bio on her website, Angie Estes has been published very widely in her career. She is the author of four books, the most recent one being Tryst (Oberlin College Press, 2009), which was selected as one of two finalists for the 2010 Pulitzer Prize. Her first book, The Uses of Passion (1995), was the winner of the Peregrine Smith Poetry Prize. Her poems have appeared in many literary magazines such as The Paris ReviewPloughsharesand Boston Review. Her essays have appeared in FIELD, Lyric Poetry Review, and Little Women: Norton Critical Edition. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize, and many grants and residencies. She is on the faculty of Ashland University’s low residency MFA program.

History, by Angie Estes

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Poem from Slate: “Late at Night”

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This week’s featured poem from Slate is entitled Late at Night, written by Gail Mazur. As you know by now, Slate does a really awesome thing by having an audio version of their weekly poem attached to the written version. But it isn’t just any audio version of the poem, it’s the poem read by its author. If you have a minute or two, check out Late at Night on the Slate poetry section to hear it read by the author, Gail Mazur.

Gail Mazur, according to her website, has written many collections of poetry. Her work includes They Can’t Take That Away from Me (University of Chicago Press, 2001), which was a finalist for the National Book Award in 2001, Zeppo’s First Wife: New & Selected Poems, (Chicago, 2005), and Figures in a Landscape (Chicago, 2011). She is the Distinguished Writer in Residence at Emerson College and Founding Director of the Blacksmith House Poetry Series in Cambridge.

Late at Night, by Gail Mazur

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Poem from Slate: “Creation Myth”

Image source: http://thisgurllovesjune.blogspot.com

This week’s featured poem from Slate is entitled Creation Myth and is written by Josh Kalscheur. As always, I’d like to encourage you to click the poem title and listen to Josh Kalscheur read his work aloud. Maybe you’re at home with lots of snow piled outside, or perhaps you’re stuck at work with lots of snow piled up outside. Either way, a little poetry always brightens your day. So check it out!

According to his page at Blackbird, Josh Kalscheur has had his work published in various outlets, such as Boston ReviewNinth Letter,WitnessAlaska Quarterly Review, and The Cincinnati Review. He teaches English at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. According to his bio at the Sycamore Review, he also served as the Poetry Editor for Devil’s Lake, a journal of poetry and prose.

Creation Myth, by Josh Kalscheur

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