Poem from Slate: Nan Cohen

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This week’s featured poem from Slate is entitled The Fear of the Dark and is written by Nan Cohen. As always, I would encourage you to check out this link to Slate’s poem page to hear Nan Cohen read her poem aloud. Hearing a poet read their work is such a great experience, and it doesn’t have to be confined to coffee shops and poetry readings. Just click this link and inject a bit of poetry into your everyday life.

Nan Cohen, according to her website, has published a book of poems entitled Rope Bridge (2005). She teaches in the Master of Professional Writing Program at the University of Southern California, and serves as the Poetry Program Director of the Napa Valley Writers Conference. She has  received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Rona Jaffe Foundation, and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.

The Fear of the Dark, by Nan Cohen

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Poem from Slate: Duy Doan

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This week’s poem from Slate is entitled History Lesson From Anh Hai and is written by Duy Doan. As always, I encourage you to check out this poem on the Slate website because they offer an audio version of the poem. And not only is it an audio version, but the poem is ready by the actual author, so you should definitely have a listen. Think of this as a bit of poetry to break up your busy morning.

Normally, I like to give a bit of background on the poet here, but I could not find anything on Duy Doan. If anyone has some info on him or knows of a website that might have his bio, feel free to pass that info along in the comments. For now, though, let’s carry on to Doan’s poem.

History Lesson From Anh Hai

I spoke to Great-Aunt tonight. She sounded like her sister.
It had been fifty years since they’d last spoken; mom said they cried over the phone.
Bà Nội used to always tell me đi tu đi con. But I know
The difference between tu and tù is one mark.

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Poem from Slate: Traci Brimhall

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This week’s poem from Slate is entitled If Marriage Is a Duel at 10 Paces and has been written by the poet Traci Brimhall. Do you have a spare moment in your day? Yes, I know, it’s hard to find a spare moment even to feed yourself with all the work you have to do. But if you’d like a moment to relax and reflect on some poetry, be sure to stop by the Slate website to hear Traci Brimhall read her poem. Listening to poetry as read by its author is a great way to connect with those powerful words. I’d definitely recommend it!

Traci Brimhall, according to her website, has released two collections of poetry, Our Lady of the Ruins (W.W. Norton, 2012) and Rookery (Southern Illinois University Press, 2010). Her poems have appeared in numerous publications such as New England Review, Ploughshares, and Southern Review. Her work has also been featured on PBS Newshour, and Best American Poetry 2013. Currently, she teaches creative writing at Western Michigan University and is the Editor in Chief for Third Coast.

If Marriage Is a Duel at 10 Pacesby Traci Brimhall

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Poem from Slate: “How to Glow”

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This week’s poem from Slate is entitled How to Glow and is written by Dean Young. I don’t know what it’s like in the corner of the globe where you’re reading this blog post, but it is currently rainy and snowy and rather miserable in Chicago. I think we could do with some glowing, don’t you? If you’d like to hear Dean Young read his poem, check out the Slate website! It’ll only take a few minutes and maybe you’ll discover a new poet whose work you can explore. Worst case scenario? You wasted a few minutes of your life. Best case scenario? You have some new art in your life! So, why not give it a listen?

According to the Poetry Foundation, Dean Young has written many collections of poetry including Strike Anywhere (1995), winner of the Colorado Prize for Poetry; Skid (2002), finalist for the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize; and Primitive Mentor (2008), shortlisted for the International Griffin Poetry Prize.  He has also written a book on poetics, The Art of Recklessness: Poetry as Assertive Force and Contradiction (2010). Young has taught at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, the low-residency MFA program at Warren Wilson College, and the University of Texas-Austin where he holds the William Livingston Chair of Poetry.

How to Glow, by Dean Young

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Poem from Slate: “The Bee”

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This week’s poem from Slate is entitled The Beewhich is something we won’t be seeing much of until the cold weather leaves these parts. This poem is written by Henri Cole and if you click through to the poem’s page on Slate, you’ll be able to hear Henri Cole actually read his poem. It’s a really awesome thing that Slate does to have the poets reading their actual work on the site, so I encourage you to check it out!

According to his page on Poets.org, Henri Cole has published several collections of poetry, including Blackbird and Wolf (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2007)—which received the 2008  Lenore Marshall Poetry PrizeMiddle Earth (2003)—which received the 2004 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, and The Marble Queen(1986). He has been awarded the Berlin Prize of the American Academy in Berlin, the Rome Prize in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the Amy Lowell Poetry Traveling Scholarship. He is also the recipient of several fellowships. He has held many teaching positions and been the artist-in-residence at various institutions, including Smith College, Reed College, Brandeis, Columbia, Harvard, and Yale Universities. He lives in Boston, Massachusetts.

The Beeby Henri Cole

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Poem from Slate: T.R. Hummer

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This week’s poem from Slate is actually three poems! The poems are titled Imperial, Pandrol Jackson, and Bloodflower Sermon. It’s an exciting bonus and all three of them are written by T.R. Hummer. In addition, all three of these poems are offered on the Slates art page in audio form. T.R. Hummer reads these three pieces on the poetry page and I want to encourage you to listen to them. It’s a rare thing to hear a poet read his or her work, so take advantage!

T.R. Hummer, according to his page on the Poetry Foundation, is a poet, critic, and editor. His collections include Lower-Class Heresy (1987), The Eighteen-Thousand-Ton Olympic Dream (1990),Walt Whitman in Hell (1996), The Infinity Sessions (2005), and Ephemeron (2011). His books of criticism include titles such as The Muse in the Machine: Essays on Poetry and the Anatomy of the Body Politic (2006) and Available Surfaces (2012). He has received the National Endowment for the Arts and two Pushcart Prizes. He has taught at various institutions, including Kenyon College, Middlebury College, Virginia Commonwealth University, the University of Georgia-Athens, and Arizona State University, where he is Director of the creative writing program.

Without further ado, here are T.R. Hummer’s poems. Be sure to click through for the additional poems.

Imperialby T.R. Hummer

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Poem from Slate: “Gun Control”

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This week’s poem from Slate is rather aptly titled Gun Control, and that is all I’ll say on the matter as this is not a political blog, but rather a literary one. This poem is written by Carol Muske-Dukes and, if you check out the Slate website, you can hear her read the poem as well. Especially this week, I’d think it would be nice to sit down and just listen to a poem read by its author.

According to her website, Carol Muske-Dukes is a professor at the University of Southern California and a former Poet Laureate of California. Her latest book of poetry is Twin Cities (Penguin Poets Series, June 2011). Her other recently released books are two anthologies: Crossing State Lines: An American Renga (co-edited with Bob Holman, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, May 2011) and The Magical Poetry Blimp Pilot’s Guide (co-edited with Diana Arterian, Figueroa Press, June 2011). Many of her collections have been “New York Times Most Notable Books” or listed in the current year’s “Best Books”.

Gun Control, by Carol Muske-Dukes

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Poem from Slate: “Red Cloth”

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This week’s poem from Slate is entitled Red Cloth and is written by Sara Peters. As the semester ends, you might be swamped with work to do and exams to take. But if you have a free moment in the end-of-semester flurry, or if you’re not a student and happen to have some time in your afternoon or evening, I encourage you to check out the audio version of this poem. Hearing poems read is a fun thing to do and hearing poems read actually by their author is even better. So check it out!

Sara Peters’ biography seems to be absent from the internet, unfortunately. So I am unable to present you with some background on her or her work as a poet. If anyone knows where I could find a bio of Sara Peters, the poet, leave the comment! For now, let’s move on to the poem.

Red Cloth, by Sara Peters

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Poem from Slate: Richard Kenney

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This week’s poem from Slate is written by Richard Kenney, and is entitled I’m Going To Have To Fire the Dream Master. Whether you’re having a rough day, a boring day, or a positively perfect day, I’d recommend surfing over to Slate’s arts page and listening to Richard Kenney read his poem. I can guarantee that it’ll change your day in one way or another. You might love it and you might hate it, but if you haven’t yet tried listening to one of these poems courtesy of Slate, give it a try!

According to The Poetry Foundation, Richard Kenney’s first collection of poetry was titled The Evolution of the Flightless Bird (1984), and it received the Yale Younger Poets Prize. Kenney’s other published works include Orrery (1985), The Invention of the Zero 1993), and One-Strand River: Poems 1994-2007 (2008). During the 1980s and ‘90s Kenney received a number of prestigious awards, including the Lannan Award, the Rome Prize in Literature from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, and a fellowship from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Kenney is professor of English at the University of Washington, where he teaches in the MFA program.

I’m Going to Have to Fire the Dream Master, by Richard Kenney

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Slate Poem: “Little Killing Ditty”

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Hello, readers! This week’s poem from Slate is actually from a few weeks ago on the Slate site, but I’m sure you won’t mind. The poem is entitled Little Killing Ditty and is written by Christian Wiman. As always, I’d like to suggest that you surf on over to the Slate site and take a few minutes out of your day to listen to Christian Wiman read his poem. Just take a few minutes of your day to relax and enjoy some poetry.

According to his page on the famous poets and poetry website, Christian Wiman “is an American poet and editor. He was born (1966) and raised in West Texas and is a graduate of Washington and Lee University. He has taught at Northwestern University, Stanford University, Lynchburg College in Virginia, and the Prague School of Economics. Since 2003, he has been editor of the oldest and most prestigious American magazine of verse, Poetry (magazine).”

Little Killing Dittyby Christian Wiman

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