Poem from Slate: “After Love”

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This week’s featured poem from Slate is entitled After Love and is written by Alan Michael Parker. As always, Slate has kindly offered an audio version of this poem, so you can surf on over there and listen to the author read his poem aloud. I suggest you check it out! Everyone needs a bit of poetry in their daily lives, so give this one a listen.

According to his biography page at the Tupelo Press website, Alan Michael Parker has written seven books of poetry, including Long Division, and edited the anthology The Imaginary Poets. His poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The American Poetry Review, Paris Review, The Best American Poetry 2011, and elsewhere. He teaches writing and literature at Davidson College and in the Queens University low-residency M.F.A. program.

After Love, by Alan Michael Parker

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Poem from Slate: “Late at Night”

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This week’s featured poem from Slate is entitled Late at Night, written by Gail Mazur. As you know by now, Slate does a really awesome thing by having an audio version of their weekly poem attached to the written version. But it isn’t just any audio version of the poem, it’s the poem read by its author. If you have a minute or two, check out Late at Night on the Slate poetry section to hear it read by the author, Gail Mazur.

Gail Mazur, according to her website, has written many collections of poetry. Her work includes They Can’t Take That Away from Me (University of Chicago Press, 2001), which was a finalist for the National Book Award in 2001, Zeppo’s First Wife: New & Selected Poems, (Chicago, 2005), and Figures in a Landscape (Chicago, 2011). She is the Distinguished Writer in Residence at Emerson College and Founding Director of the Blacksmith House Poetry Series in Cambridge.

Late at Night, by Gail Mazur

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Poem from Slate: “Creation Myth”

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This week’s featured poem from Slate is entitled Creation Myth and is written by Josh Kalscheur. As always, I’d like to encourage you to click the poem title and listen to Josh Kalscheur read his work aloud. Maybe you’re at home with lots of snow piled outside, or perhaps you’re stuck at work with lots of snow piled up outside. Either way, a little poetry always brightens your day. So check it out!

According to his page at Blackbird, Josh Kalscheur has had his work published in various outlets, such as Boston ReviewNinth Letter,WitnessAlaska Quarterly Review, and The Cincinnati Review. He teaches English at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. According to his bio at the Sycamore Review, he also served as the Poetry Editor for Devil’s Lake, a journal of poetry and prose.

Creation Myth, by Josh Kalscheur

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Poem from Slate: Nan Cohen

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This week’s featured poem from Slate is entitled The Fear of the Dark and is written by Nan Cohen. As always, I would encourage you to check out this link to Slate’s poem page to hear Nan Cohen read her poem aloud. Hearing a poet read their work is such a great experience, and it doesn’t have to be confined to coffee shops and poetry readings. Just click this link and inject a bit of poetry into your everyday life.

Nan Cohen, according to her website, has published a book of poems entitled Rope Bridge (2005). She teaches in the Master of Professional Writing Program at the University of Southern California, and serves as the Poetry Program Director of the Napa Valley Writers Conference. She has  received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Rona Jaffe Foundation, and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.

The Fear of the Dark, by Nan Cohen

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Poem from Slate: Duy Doan

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This week’s poem from Slate is entitled History Lesson From Anh Hai and is written by Duy Doan. As always, I encourage you to check out this poem on the Slate website because they offer an audio version of the poem. And not only is it an audio version, but the poem is ready by the actual author, so you should definitely have a listen. Think of this as a bit of poetry to break up your busy morning.

Normally, I like to give a bit of background on the poet here, but I could not find anything on Duy Doan. If anyone has some info on him or knows of a website that might have his bio, feel free to pass that info along in the comments. For now, though, let’s carry on to Doan’s poem.

History Lesson From Anh Hai

I spoke to Great-Aunt tonight. She sounded like her sister.
It had been fifty years since they’d last spoken; mom said they cried over the phone.
Bà Nội used to always tell me đi tu đi con. But I know
The difference between tu and tù is one mark.

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Poem from Slate: Traci Brimhall

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This week’s poem from Slate is entitled If Marriage Is a Duel at 10 Paces and has been written by the poet Traci Brimhall. Do you have a spare moment in your day? Yes, I know, it’s hard to find a spare moment even to feed yourself with all the work you have to do. But if you’d like a moment to relax and reflect on some poetry, be sure to stop by the Slate website to hear Traci Brimhall read her poem. Listening to poetry as read by its author is a great way to connect with those powerful words. I’d definitely recommend it!

Traci Brimhall, according to her website, has released two collections of poetry, Our Lady of the Ruins (W.W. Norton, 2012) and Rookery (Southern Illinois University Press, 2010). Her poems have appeared in numerous publications such as New England Review, Ploughshares, and Southern Review. Her work has also been featured on PBS Newshour, and Best American Poetry 2013. Currently, she teaches creative writing at Western Michigan University and is the Editor in Chief for Third Coast.

If Marriage Is a Duel at 10 Pacesby Traci Brimhall

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Poem from Slate: “How to Glow”

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This week’s poem from Slate is entitled How to Glow and is written by Dean Young. I don’t know what it’s like in the corner of the globe where you’re reading this blog post, but it is currently rainy and snowy and rather miserable in Chicago. I think we could do with some glowing, don’t you? If you’d like to hear Dean Young read his poem, check out the Slate website! It’ll only take a few minutes and maybe you’ll discover a new poet whose work you can explore. Worst case scenario? You wasted a few minutes of your life. Best case scenario? You have some new art in your life! So, why not give it a listen?

According to the Poetry Foundation, Dean Young has written many collections of poetry including Strike Anywhere (1995), winner of the Colorado Prize for Poetry; Skid (2002), finalist for the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize; and Primitive Mentor (2008), shortlisted for the International Griffin Poetry Prize.  He has also written a book on poetics, The Art of Recklessness: Poetry as Assertive Force and Contradiction (2010). Young has taught at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, the low-residency MFA program at Warren Wilson College, and the University of Texas-Austin where he holds the William Livingston Chair of Poetry.

How to Glow, by Dean Young

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