Jet Fuel Jukebox for 3/14/17

On this especially snowy March Tuesday morning, we introduce to you a brand new Jet Fuel Jukebox. Welcome it with open arms, won’t you?

It seems that Charli XCX’s new mixtape (which dropped this past Friday) has made quite the impression on both Jake and I, as we’ve both decided to highlight a track from her latest release, Number 1 Angel. Elsewhere, you’ll notice new tracks from Lorde and Little Dragon, who both showed up on this playlist over the past few weeks with their previous singles.

The 20-song playlist is rounded out by additions from Anderson Paak, Foxes, and Vampire Weekend.

— Michael Lane, Blog Editor

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Editor’s Notes #189

Image source: http://editorialiste.blogspot.com

Hey, blog readers! I hope you’re all doing well. Before we take a look at some recent posts from our editors, I want to remind you about the Jet Fuel Review‘s current reading period. We are accepting submissions until March 15th, so you still have a few more days to submit your work! If you’re interested, you can send us your stuff right here.

As always, Michael Lane and Jake Johnson have selected some songs for our Jet Fuel Jukebox playlist. Check out this post from the end of February, as well as their first post in March. In addition, Michael Lane wrote a great review of Jordan Peele’s directorial debut, the horror film Get Out.

There have been two new additions to Sabrina’s Book Corner. These posts review Old Magic by Marianne Curley and Nearly Gone by Elle Cosimano. Gina Capperino’s latest “romantic inquiry” focuses on The Longest Ride by Nicholas Sparks.

Our comics blogger, Quinn Stratton, recently reviewed Daniel Clowes’ newest graphic novel, Patience. And our “casual critics” have reviewed some new films. Donatas Ruzys reviewed M. Night Shyamalan’s Split, and Reno Stramaglia reviewed Hacksaw Ridge.

At the beginning of the month, we posted another Artist’s Portfolio post. This time around, we featured the work of Lewis student Larissa Barnat. Check out the post to learn more about Larissa and to see her stunning oil paintings.

Finally, be sure to check out the last two “Meet the Editors” posts of this semester. In recent weeks, we featured Miguel Soto, our Special Sections Editor, and Jacqueline Nelson, our Art & Design Editor.

Stick with us next week for more awesome posts!

— Jet Fuel Blog Editor, Mary Egan

 

Sabrina’s Book Corner: Find Me

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Hello, and welcome back to Sabrina’s Book Corner! This week we are going to be discussing Nearly Gone by Elle Cosimano.

Nearly is just trying to get into a good college. She is competing with her best friend, along with another student, for a full-ride science/chemistry scholarship. All three are evenly matched in academic achievement, so the scholarship will be awarded to the student who scores highest in the class.

Nearly follows her own rules: no bad grades, no trouble, and no touching. The rules have always served her well, until there is a murder at Nearly’s school and the killer seems to be calling her out.

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Meet the Editors: Jacqueline Nelson

Jacqueline Nelson

It’s Friday again, so that means we have another Meet the Editors post. This is actually our last new editor for the semester! Today we are introducing Jacqueline Nelson, who is working with us this semester as our Art & Design Editor.

Jacqueline is a computer graphic design major at Lewis University. This is only her second semester at Lewis, but she already feels at home. She is 22, but 35 in spirit. Somehow, she is both the tallest and the youngest in her family. She loves finding new places to explore with friends, especially in Chicago. Art and design has always fascinated her, and has been a part of her life for as long as she can remember. (Throwback to the KLUTZ craft books, y’all!) Her goal is to translate this passion into her work with the Jet Fuel Review.

Below is our Q&A with Jacqueline:

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Casual Critics: Heroism Upon Hacksaw – A Review of “Hacksaw Ridge”

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Hacksaw Ridge, directed by Mel Gibson, is a biographical drama based upon the true story and extraordinary life of Desmond T. Doss (played by Andrew Garfield in the film), a man who served as a conscientious objector in the U.S. Army in World War II. Although he participated in one of the bloodiest battles of the war, Doss completely refused to carry any type of firearm during his time as a combat medic. Instilled upon him at an early age was a religious faith that he swore to uphold for the rest of his life.

Of the Ten Commandments, “thou shall not kill” played a huge role in why Doss decided not to carry a weapon amongst the carnage and atrocities surrounding him, while Desmond’s faith as a Seventh-day Adventist compelled him to risk his life in order to save the lives of others. Mel Gibson does an incredible job of depicting the heroic actions of Doss, who was the first conscientious objector to receive a Medal of Honor.

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Words an’ Pictures: Cosmic Timewarp Deathtrip – A Review of “Patience” by Daniel Clowes

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Patience, the latest graphic novel from Daniel Clowes (Ghost World, Like a Velvet Glove Cast in Iron), presents a story that is very much rooted in themes that the author has been exploring for some time, but also reaches beyond anything that he has done previously. The plot of Patience revolves around Jack Barlow, a man who travels through time to prevent the murder of his wife Patience. From that basic premise, Clowes is able to accomplish a great deal, exploring masculinity, justice, anger, the nature of consciousness, and love, in what is arguably the most firmly developed narrative found in any of his books.

Patience continues in the science fiction vein last explored by Clowes in his 2011 novel The Death-Ray, with time travel being a significant vehicle for the plot. The science-fiction aspect of the story is never overemphasized, however, leaving much more time for the human element to be examined. The novel opens in 2012, with Jack and Patience living together as a happy but anxious couple who are madly in love and about to become parents. It is implied that Patience has had a troublesome and abusive past, about which Jack knows very little. I never got the sense that this is because of outright callousness, however, but rather due to Jack not wanting to even think about Patience suffering. This bubble is burst when he arrives home to find Patience dead on the floor of their apartment, a narrative box telling the reader, “And this is where my story begins.”

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Jordan Peele’s Directorial Debut Delivers: A Review of “Get Out”

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If you look back on the history of horror cinema, you’ll find that many make use of timely social issues in order to convey poignant commentary on their respective subjects. Visionary horror director George Romero continually did it in his Dead series, with Night of the Living Dead tackling race relations during the height of the Civil Rights movement, while Dawn of the Dead took shots at consumerism and its power to literally turn society into zombies. The Purge series of films delve into classism, Rosemary’s Baby is related to feminist ideals, They Live looks at the power of the media, and plenty of other examples handle countless other social issues.

The latest film to do this is Get Out, which comes courtesy of comedian-turned-writer/director Jordan Peele. Get Out is Peele’s first foray into the horror genre, as well as his first time being in the director’s chair, but this is never apparent as you watch it. The film is so successful in so many aspects that it ends up not only being one of the most impressive debuts of the last decade, but also perhaps the most socially charged mainstream horror film in that timespan as well.

Get Out’s central character is Chris (Daniel Kaluuya), a 20-something black man who’s in an interracial relationship with his white girlfriend, Rose (Allison Williams), who plans to take him along for a visit at her family’s house for a weekend getaway. Chris is noticeably skeptical about the trip and coyly asks Rose if her parents are aware that he’s black, implying that he believes he may not feel welcomed by Rose’s family. “My dad would vote for Obama for a third term if he could,” Rose responds, Peele obviously making fun of the people who say things like, “I have a black friend,” as if that can automatically save them if they have racist opinions or support racist ideas. The punchline of the joke lands a little later on when Rose’s father recites this line to Chris verbatim.

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