Discuss: Summer Reads

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http://mollyaustin.com

For me, summer has always been all about the reading I can get done while the weather is nice. Back when I was in school, summer meant so many more free hours to lose myself in stories. I miss those late nights and lazy afternoons, but summer is still a time when I look forward to reading new books and getting excited about stories. Sure, that may happen all year round now, but summer still has something special about it.

Of course, it can be fun to read on the road while you’re traveling, and then lounge around in a fabulous new locale reading the next book on your list. But not all of us can take that fabulous vacation. For those of us who are stuck at home this summer, Publisher’s Weekly has compiled a list of books to read when you’re not travleing this summer. Emma Straub, author of The Vacationers, has listed some of the books she is looking forward to reading this summer. I quite like this list and there are a few books here that I’m also interested in reading.

The first title mentioned on this list is In the Woods, by Tana French. I heard about this book about a year or so ago and I was intrigued. I found it at Half Price Books for very cheap, along with its sequel — The Likeness — and I have yet to read either of them. It’s been described as an eerie mystery, and I think that would be just the thing to read on a sweltering day when you’re stuck inside.

As a reader of the fantasy genre, I am also intrigued by Magic for Beginners by Kelly Link. It’s described as a collection of fantasy and light horror stories, which I think would be really interesting to read.

Going off the Publisher’s Weekly list for a moment now, what would you like to read this summer? Personally, I’m looking forward to reading some fantasy books, some mystery books, and some LGBT-related books this summer. On my list right now I have To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis, In the Woods by Tana French, and Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz.

What are you itching to read this summer? Share your list in the comments!

— Jet Fuel Blog Editor, Mary Egan

Discuss: Summer Reading Redux

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http://waltham.lib.ma.us

A couple of weeks ago I did a post about summer reading. I had originally intended for it to be all about the “summer blockbuster” books that are coming out this year, but it ended up being about the nostalgia of being a kid who read a lot in the summer. If you’re interested in that, go check out the post. But this week we really are doing the summer blockbuster list. If you’re interested in that kind of thing, then proceed!

Recently, Paste magazine compiled a list of 20 New Books to Read This Summer. The list seems to contain something for everyone, so you’re bound to find something you’ll like. Neil Gaiman has a new book out entitled The Ocean at the End of the Lane, which is about modern fantasy for adults. This list also contains the rather hilarious selection of A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook. I wonder if there are ideas for what to serve at The Red Wedding (too soon?). There’s also Khaled Hosseini’s new book, And the Mountains Echoed. If you read and loved The Kite Runner, you’ll probably love Hosseini’s latest work.

For those who might enjoy shorter stories rather than full-length novels, there is The Color Master: Stories by Aimee Bender. I studied Bender’s stories in one of my creative writing courses at college and just recently got my hands on a copy of The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake, so I’d be interested in this latest collection of stories.

As I said, the list encompasses both intellectual reads and beach reads. Fantasy and reality, novels and short stories are all included here. If you’re looking for something new to read and want to read the latest books, check out the article here.

What “summer blockbuster” books are you looking forward to? Are there any not included on this list that you’re excited for? Share your summer reading plans, whether they include the best-sellers or not, in the comments!

— Jet Fuel Blog Editor, Mary Egan

Discuss: Summer Reading

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http://politics-prose.com

Generally, I try to read all year round. I always have at least one book going (sometimes two) and it actually terrifies me to not have something lined up for when I finish reading my current book. But summer has always been something special. The summer makes me think of long afternoons in darkened rooms when it’s ninety degrees outside. It makes me think of summer reading challenges at the local library that result in cheesy plastic toys, but it never mattered because the real prize was reading all of those books. Now that I’m an “adult,” you would think that the mystique of summer reading has worn away. Well, not entirely. For some reason, the summer always makes me (even more) excited about reading.

These days it can be hard to find isolated pockets of time to do nothing but read books. I have a job now and a lot of my time tends to fill up with internet-related procrastination tools and keeping up with my subscription to The New Yorker. But this past weekend I spent about two or three hours doing nothing but reading and it just made me feel so content. This summer, we should all try to take some time away from our computers and other glowing screens to just read for a while. Unless, of course, you happen to be reading on a Kindle.

My personal summer reading list is partly planned and partly seat-of-my-pants. I have a few books in mind that I’d like to read over the next few warm months (The Name of The Star by Maureen Johnson, the final two books in the Princess Diaries series, The Woman Who Died A Lot by Jasper Fforde, and some classics that are languishing on my shelves), but I like to keep my reading schedule open as well.

What are your experiences with summer reading? Do you have a list of books you’d like to read this summer? What are some of your fondest summer-related reading memories? Share them in the comments!

— Jet Fuel Blog Editor, Mary Egan