Jet Fuel Jukebox: Super Late Night Edition

Anyone still awake? Probably not. Oh well. We’re still going to put this brand new Jukebox up right now!

This will be our last regularly scheduled playlist of the year. We’re going to take a few weeks off until the very end of the year, when we will be publishing a special Top 50 Songs of 2017 Jukebox, along with our respective Top 10 Albums of 2017 lists. So be sure to check back in then for more lists featuring great music!

For now, though, Jake and I have 20 new tracks for y’all to try out, including new tracks from BROCKHAMPTON, MGMT, Charli XCX, and Sufjan Stevens.

— Michael Lane, Blog Editor

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Welcome to Tommy Planet: A Review of “The Disaster Artist”

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Over the course of two weeks in the summer of 2003, an indie film called The Room made an almost nonexistent splash when it screened at only two theaters in the heart of Los Angeles, returning a mere $1,800 on an apparent $6 million budget. The film should have likely disappeared from the annals of pop culture altogether, but The Room is one of those “so bad it’s good” kind of movies — one commonly (and deservedly) referred to as the greatest worst movie of all time. Its destiny would be to soon become a beloved cult-classic of larger-than-life proportions, with many of its biggest proprietors among Hollywood’s most well-known stars — one of which is James Franco, whose latest endeavor is based on the film’s ludicrous production.

Directly inspired by a 2013 novel of the same name and written by The Room co-star Greg Sestero, James Franco’s The Disaster Artist is Ed Wood for the millennial generation. Like the infamous film it is based on, James Franco directs, produces, and stars in The Disaster Artist, and is unbelievably brilliant in his portrayal of the film’s notorious creator, Tommy Wiseau. Franco absolutely nails every aspect of the man from his accent to his mannerisms — almost to the point that it seems he was quite obsessed with Wiseau. His co-stars are similarly wonderful, with his A-list friends and frequent collaborators making up many of the supporting roles (including Seth Rogen, Alison Brie, and Josh Hutcherson).

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Jet Fuel Jukebox for 12/5/17

Great news, everyone! Spotify has released its personalized statistics that, if you have an account, give you a look at your year in listening. This is one of my favorite times of the year, because I get to find out how I listened to 32 days-worth of music these last 365 days. You can find yours at 2017wrapped.com

Anyways, this week on the Jukebox we have a great number of new artists highlighted within the 20 tracks included. Look out for songs by Daniel Caesar, Diet Cig, Sigrid, Kim Petras, and more!

— Michael Lane, Blog Editor

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Jet Fuel Jukebox for 11/28/17

We’ve arrived in the wasteland that is the dry period of late-year music releases (or, lack thereof). There’s absolutely nothing that came out this past Friday that caught my ear, so I’ve gone to looking back for inspiration on my half of the Jukebox this week.

Jake’s done his best keeping his half of the playlist current, but the first ten tracks of the proceedings are 80s English throwbacks, spurred by my decision to spin The Cure’s The Head on the Door the other day. What a wonderful album that is.

And alongside a track from that Cure record, we also have tracks from Duran Duran, Wet, Maroon 5, and Elvis Costello & The Attractions.

— Michael Lane,  Blog Editor

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Jet Fuel Jukebox for 11/21/17

Some of my favorite weeks on the Jet Fuel Jukebox are when there’s crossover between the 10 choices that Jake and I make for the playlist. This week, it’s an album entitled Blue Lips, which is the third full-length release from Swedish pop star, Tove Lo. Each of us has gone ahead and inserted into our halves of the playlist a favorite from the new album, which saw its long-awaited release this past Friday.

Alongside this, I have another major highlight with the Jukebox’s closer this week, “Smoking Section,” from St. Vincent’s latest album release, MASSEDUCTION. This past weekend, I had the immense pleasure of seeing her live performance at the Riverside Theater in Milwaukee. I’ve loved Annie Clark for years, previously claiming that she sits in my current top three artists, and my first time seeing her live did not disappoint. Hell, the show was better than I ever could have imagined. If you get the chance, see St. Vincent live; there’s no way you couldn’t enjoy yourself.

As for the rest of the playlist this week, we have 17 fellow tracks courtesy of artists like Tame Impala, P!nk, Sampha, and Princess Nokia.

— Michael Lane, Blog Editor

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All A-bored!: A Review of “Murder on the Orient Express” (2017)

http://bit.ly/2yO1mUH

The newest adaptation of Agatha Christie’s classic whodunit novel, Murder on the Orient Express, wishes it was a film from an older, simpler time, when a central mystery as lacking as the one it presents would have likely been enough to satisfy its viewers. But in 2017, with there being a large catalog of murder-mystery films that offer grander puzzles of suspense with far superior payoffs, this lavishly produced remake loses steam long before it arrives at its underwhelming destination. The film isn’t without any merit, as its graceful cinematography highlights gorgeous period-appropriate set and costume design, and the ensemble cast of both old and new A-listers (including Michelle Pfeiffer, Daisy Ridley, Penélope Cruz, and Willem Dafoe) do formidable work, even with the lackluster material they’ve been handed. Ultimately, though, director Kenneth Branagh’s attempt at remaking this nearly century-old story is absent of any fresh additions or twists, leaving its savvier viewers with an unsatisfying mystery to solve.

Branagh also serves as the story’s mustached lead and famed hero detective, Hercule Poirot. In the winter of 1934, Poirot boards the Orient Express from Istanbul on his way home to help solve yet another case, hoping that the short train ride itself will provide some sort of relaxation. But, of course, it’s never that simple. Poirot becomes sidetracked when a particularly shady passenger aboard the train, Samuel Ratchett (Johnny Depp), asks to buy his protection after receiving an increasingly alarming amount of threatening letters. Poirot refuses, and the following morning, awakens to find that Ratchett has been brutally murdered in his sleep only a few cabins down, with 12 erratic stab wounds and minimal evidence hampering his insight on who done it. Along with this, an avalanche has resulted in the train’s derailing, stranding its anxious passengers while they wait upon a rescue crew.

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Jet Fuel Jukebox for 11/14/17

Monday got you feeling down? Well, 1: It’s Tuesday, and 2: Jake and I have arrived with our weekly supply of new music for you to listen to and (hopefully) enjoy!

While album releases have more or less been halted as of late — except for that gargantuan, new Taylor Swift record that released this past Friday — there have been a number of stellar singles hitting the charts. With this week’s playlist, we’ve highlighted some of these new singles.

Hit play on the Jukebox below, and savor the excellent brand new sounds from Whitney, Carly Rae Jepsen, The Wombats, and Rita Ora.

— Michael Lane, Blog Editor

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