Discuss: Re-Reading Books

http://harrypotter.wikia.com
http://harrypotter.wikia.com

When I was younger, I was very big on re-reading books. These days, my to-be-read pile is so large that it’s simply not practical to be re-reading books I’ve already read. But I still think there’s merit in re-reading and there are other ways to go about it than just sitting down with the book from your shelf that’s loved and dog-eared.

Back in the day, I had more free time to kill, so I was able to spend afternoons just paging through stories I had already experienced so I could experience them again. Most of this penchant for re-reading stemmed from Harry Potter. When you’re waiting for the next book in a series like that to come out, you need to feed your need somehow. I spent hours upon hours in the world of Harry Potter and have re-read those books more times than I can possibly count. On each re-reading, I seemed to experience something new. But the thing that never changed was the comfort and the sense of coming home that I got (and still get) from those books.

Earlier this year I began listening to some old episodes of a Harry Potter podcast and I got the itch. I wanted to re-read the books. With the aforementioned to-be-read pile of books glaring at me, I knew I had to find another way than actually reading the books with my own eyes. Luckily, the Harry Potter audiobooks are amazing. I had never had the patience for the audiobooks when I was younger, preferring instead to fly through the books at my own pace. But now I can listen to Harry Potter in the car and even at work and it’s been great. I’m on Goblet of Fire right now and I’m really enjoying this re-read that is actually  a re-listen.

How do you feel about re-reads? Do you think it’s worthwhile to re-read a book you’ve already been through? What are some of your favorite books to re-read? Leave your thoughts in the comments!

— Jet Fuel Blog Editor, Mary Egan

Discuss: Summer Reading

http://politics-prose.com
http://politics-prose.com

Generally, I try to read all year round. I always have at least one book going (sometimes two) and it actually terrifies me to not have something lined up for when I finish reading my current book. But summer has always been something special. The summer makes me think of long afternoons in darkened rooms when it’s ninety degrees outside. It makes me think of summer reading challenges at the local library that result in cheesy plastic toys, but it never mattered because the real prize was reading all of those books. Now that I’m an “adult,” you would think that the mystique of summer reading has worn away. Well, not entirely. For some reason, the summer always makes me (even more) excited about reading.

These days it can be hard to find isolated pockets of time to do nothing but read books. I have a job now and a lot of my time tends to fill up with internet-related procrastination tools and keeping up with my subscription to The New Yorker. But this past weekend I spent about two or three hours doing nothing but reading and it just made me feel so content. This summer, we should all try to take some time away from our computers and other glowing screens to just read for a while. Unless, of course, you happen to be reading on a Kindle.

My personal summer reading list is partly planned and partly seat-of-my-pants. I have a few books in mind that I’d like to read over the next few warm months (The Name of The Star by Maureen Johnson, the final two books in the Princess Diaries series, The Woman Who Died A Lot by Jasper Fforde, and some classics that are languishing on my shelves), but I like to keep my reading schedule open as well.

What are your experiences with summer reading? Do you have a list of books you’d like to read this summer? What are some of your fondest summer-related reading memories? Share them in the comments!

— Jet Fuel Blog Editor, Mary Egan