Student Feature: Themes in Hawthorne

Source: http://slais.ubc.ca

Editor’s Note: This post has been written by Allie Penchar, a student in Dr. White’s American Literature class at Lewis University.  Dr. White’s students were to submit one of their public posts for the class to the Jet Fuel Review Blog as an assignment. Allie has provided her post on American motifs in short stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

America is all about the individual selves, always questioning the environment around us as well as ourselves when trying to fit into the new environment we have been settled in. In Nathaniel Hawthorne’s works he expresses this American motif through his suspenseful twisting plots. In Hawthorne’s short stories, “My Kinsman, Major Molineux”, “The Minister’s Black Veil” and “Young Goodman Brown” they all share the major theme of doubt in the time of a new nation. The American motifs that are expressed in these stories collectively are the exploring of new territory as well as exploring the self and the theme of the individual self making its way into the new nation.

Continue reading

Student Feature: Women in American Lit

Anne Bradstreet -- image source: http://poemofquotes.com

A quick note about commenting: If you click the little number in the talk-balloon button at the top right of this entry, you can comment very easily on what you see here. We’d love to see some comments begin to pour in as that will help us grow our community!

Editor’s Note: This post has been written by Katie Esposito, a student in Dr. White’s American Literature class at Lewis University.  Dr. White’s students were to submit one of their public posts for the class to the Jet Fuel Review Blog as an assignment. Katie has provided her post on the role of women in early American literature.

Public Post 2: Women in Early American Literature

Early American literature was mostly dominated by men and the women of the time never imagined that their words could ever compare to a male’s ideas or writings.  However, several women wrote on their own without having the intention of publishing their works someday.  Two significant women in early American literature are Anne Bradstreet and Mary Rowlandson, who were both unaware of how compelling and momentous their writings would become.

Continue reading

Student Feature: Native American Literature

Image source: http://amazon.com

A quick note about commenting: If you click the little number in the talk-balloon button at the top right of this entry, you can comment very easily on what you see here. We’d love to see some comments begin to pour in as that will help us grow our community!

Editor’s Note: This post has been written by Ryan Arciero, a student in Dr. White’s American Literature class at Lewis University.  Dr. White’s students were to submit one of their public posts for the class to the Jet Fuel Review Blog as an assignment. Ryan has provided his post on Native American creation stories

Public Post 1: The True Founders of Early American Literature: Native Americans

Many Americans consider themselves to be the honest originators of this great country—that all works of classic “American Literature” must of course first come from the colonists’ wise and witty tongues.  What we do not realize is that there were Americans present here far before us, with their own rich culture and grand literary history.  These were the Native Americans, indigenous people with a strong sense of community, spirituality, and connectedness with nature.  Unlike the current American philosophy, which so often searches for a single, undeniable truth, Native Americans were both accepting and appreciative of different versions of oral traditions.  One particular aspect of this cooperative spirit between the indigenous peoples concerns religion and the sacred commencement of mankind.

Continue reading