A Community Collaboration: Collaborative Writing

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Jet Fuel Review Issue #17 Cover

For our Spring 2019 issue of Jet Fuel Review (with cover art by artist Delano Dunn) there is a special section that presents collaborative writing, which is writing that multiple artist’s crafted. As a way to celebrate the successful launch of our 17th issue, we’ve asked some of students, faculty, and alumni to join in and construct a piece, or multiple,  that they created with their peers.

Presented below is a segment of the Special Section’s introduction as written by JFR Managing Editor, Zakiya Cowan, and a collection of fantastic collaboratively written pieces by some of our very own editors of Jet Fuel Review as well as some members of the Lewis University community. In summation, each of these pieces remain as a showcase of the bridge of collaboration and we are excited to present this talent.

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A Community Collaboration: Centos

Jet Fuel Review Issue #15 Cover

Inside our new Spring 2018 issue of Jet Fuel Review (with cover art by Australian artist Jim Tsinganos), you will find a special section that specifically highlights a particular style of poem known as the cento, which is a unique form in which an author creates a piece by stitching together lines borrowed only from the works of others. To help kick-off the launch celebration of our 15th issue, we’ve asked some of our own to join in on the fun and construct a piece or two themselves.

Presented below is a portion of the Special Section’s introduction as written by JFR Assistant Managing Editor, Zakiya Cowan, followed by a collection of wonderful centos written by not only the editors of Jet Fuel Review but also some members of the Lewis University community at large. A few of the writers included here are experienced veterans of the genre, others are amateurs, and some have never written a poem in their adult life. However, each piece remains a showcase of talent and form that we are incredibly excited to share with you.

Read on,

— Michael Lane, Blog Editor

The Jet Fuel Review editors are excited to share with you the noteworthy gem of Issue 15, our cento collection. “Cento” is Latin for “patchwork,” and in terms of poetic form, a cento is a “patchwork” of lines taken from various works. According to the introduction of Hosidius Geta’s Medea:” A Virgilian Cento, by Joseph J. Mooney, Geta’s “Medea” is the first recorded cento, dating back between 200 C.E. and 300 A.D. Classified as a Virgilian cento, “Medea” is composed of lines from works by the ancient Roman poet, Virgil. A Frankenstein-like composition, each line is carefully sutured to the next in order to create thought-provoking images and metaphors that seamlessly weld with one another, and ultimately crafts a piece that pays homage to other’s work while creating a new text.

We hope you both enjoy and appreciate the thoughtful artistry that is involved when constructing the cento, and hopefully discover a newfound love for this longstanding, intricate form.

Read on,

— Zakiya Cowan, Assistant Managing Editor

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Three Perspectives on “Snowpiercer”

Below are three perspectives on the 2013 film Snowpiercer.

**SPOILERS AHEAD**

Sarah George
Engine or tail; where do you belong on the train?

http://imdb.to/1jCkcBi
http://imdb.to/1jCkcBi

In 2013, Bong Joon-ho directed a film that received universal acclaim for keeping the audience on the edge of their seats. Snowpiercer is an action, drama, and science-fiction film that introduces viewers to a world where the lines between good and evil are blurred. Chris Evans portrays Curtis, the tail-section passenger determined to reach the front of the train. Jamie Bell plays Edgar, a young man who worships Curtis, but never seems to be able to impress him.

As the film progresses, Curtis is able to form a plan that gets tail-section dwellers to the front section. As the audience goes on this journey with Curtis, we see his horror as he realizes that the insects on the train are being used for the protein blocks being fed to the tail-section passengers.

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Jet Fuel Review Special Section: Bouts-Rimés

The Jet Fuel Review is hosting a bouts-rimés dossier for our Spring 2016 issue in addition to its regular content. A bouts-rimés is essentially a collaborative sonnet in which everyone uses the same proposed rhymes in the same order. Please feel free to send us 1-3 bouts-rimés using the rhymes below in their specific order. You can submit your work here. The proposed rhymes are as follows:

a: envelope
b: orange
a: telescope
b: singe

c: eyelash
d: wire
c: mustache
d: fire

e: underhand
f: render
e: ampersand
f: tender

g: photogenic
g: pomegranate

From the Encyclopedia Britannica:
bouts-rimés, (French: “rhymed ends”), rhymed words or syllables to which verses are written, best known from a literary game of making verses from a list of rhyming words supplied by another person. The game, which requires that the rhymes follow a given order and that the result make a modicum of sense, is said to have been invented by the minor French poet Dulot in the early 17th century. Its wide popularity inspired at least one notable tour de force, an extended satirical poem by the French poet Jean-François Sarasin.). The fad was revived in the 19th century when Alexandre Dumas invited French poets and versifiers to try their skill with given sets of rhymes and published the results in 1865.

Three Perspectives: Why Halloween is a Classic Film

Three Student Perspectives on the Endurance of John Carpenter’s Halloween:

**SPOILERS AHEAD**

Ahimme CazarezHalloween_cover
John Carpenter’s Halloween is one of the most enduring American horror films ever made because of the sense of obscurity, mystery, and abnormality we receive from the character of Michael Myers. When first introduced to Myers, we are not sure of his past or why he behaves in the way that he does. We do not understand why he kills his sister or what his motives are for killing others. As the audience, we try to answer those questions ourselves and comprehend what is happening. In my case, I would argue that Myers was feeling some kind of grudge toward his sister for not taking care of him properly and not providing him attention. His sister was attending to her boyfriend and not him, which angered him tremendously, making him want to kill her.

If we look at the situation in a Freudian way, we could even argue that Myers had some kind of physical attraction to his sister. But we never really know his true intentions, and it is that type of secrecy that really captivates an audience. The use of normal, small town, teenage characters also allows for viewers to identify with what is happening, making the story more impactful. At some points it even becomes believable. A deranged stranger that hunts for his victims on a night like Halloween sounds like something that could actually happen. All this, topped off with the iconic violent scenes that spawned the usage of slash and gore in horror film, makes this movie revolutionary.

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Would You Like to Post Here?

Source image: http://kirtok.com

A quick note about commentingSome of you expressed some confusion about how to comment on our posts here at the blog. If you click the little “0″ in the talk-balloon button at the top right of this entry, you can comment very easily on what you see here. We’d love to see some comments begin to pour in as that will help us grow our community!

We’re looking for more people who’d like to post here at the Lewis Lit Journal blog! I can’t do it all by myself and we want the blog to be flourishing with content. The only way to accomplish this is to get more of you involved. In addition, I’d like to have a diverse group of feelings, ideas, opinions, and perspectives represented here.

If you’re interested in being a contributing blogger to the Lewis Lit Journal blog, please send an email to lewislitjournal [at] gmail [dot] com and let us know! We’re looking for folks who are dedicated and will remain consistent when producing content for the blog. In your email, please include a short bio/intro about yourself, and the following:

  • Any previous experience with blogging (where was it done? Even if you’ve blogged on a personal level, that will count as experience)
  • How many days you would be willing to blog each week (I’m already planning on updating the blog each day of the week, so I need your help to keep up that pace)
  • Ideas you have for featured posts, posts that could become a regular feature such as “Prompt Wednesdays” or “Pick-a-Poem”
  • Why you feel you’d be an addition to the Lewis Lit Blog
  • What you would be interested in blogging about here, whether it be fiction, non-fiction, poetry, artwork, or another type of medium such as film, music, or even podcasts.

Just send us an email anytime before Monday, October 11th and you’ll be considered as a guest poster here at the blog.

Reminder: The contest for the title of the Lewis Literary Journal is still being held. The deadline for submitted ideas is October 11th, so please keep sending us suggestions at lewislitjournal [at] gmail [dot] com!