Meet the Editors: Brittney Crosse

This semester is going quick, and this is the third Meet the Editors post already! This week we present a member of Jet Fuel Review who is our assistant fiction and nonfiction editor and copy editor. Brittney Crosse is this week’s featured editor for Jet Fuel Review, and here is some more about her:

Brittany Crosse is a junior at Lewis University who has previously attended Moraine Valley Community College. She is majoring in English with a concentration in Creative Writing, and hopes to one day make a career out of writing short stories, which has been a goal of hers ever since she was little. In addition to writing, she also plans to teach fiction writing at the university level. Her interests outside of writing include TV shows, anime, music, video games, and books, her favorite authors being Neal Shusterman, Stephen King, and Haruki Murakami. Brittany spends most of her time with her dog Cordelia, a.k.a. “Cordy.”

Below is our Q&A with Crosse:

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Spangler’s From Sentence to Screen: The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is a 2005 fantasy film co-written and directed by Andrew Adamson. The film is based off of the 1950’s novel, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, by C.S. Lewis. This story centers around four siblings named Peter (William Moseley), Susan (Anna Popplewell), Edmund (Skandar Keynes), and Lucy Pevensie (Georgie Henley) who have been sent away to life in the countryside of England because of WWII. They are living with the strange Professor Kirke (Jim Broadbent), who’s large home is filled with many interesting things. One day when the children are playing hide and seek the youngest, Lucy, finds herself in an empty room with nothing but a wardrobe to hide in. The wardrobe is a doorway into the fantasy world of Narnia, where Lucy meets a faun named Mr. Tumnus (James McAvoy) who tells her all about Narnia and the Witch Witch who tyrannically rules over the Narnians.

When she returns to “our” world, Lucy tries to tell her siblings what happened but none of them believe her. Later that night Lucy sneaks out of her room and goes back to Narnia through the wardrobe. Edmund follows her into the strange land realizing she has been telling the truth, but when they get back he tells their siblings that Lucy was just making it all up. A few days later, when they are trying to hide from the strict housekeeper, the children wind up in the empty room and have no choice but to go in the wardrobe. The four siblings escape and find themselves in Narnia. Soon the Pevensies find themselves playing a large part in stopping the White Witch in the coming war. In this blog post I will be looking at how the film changed the beginning of the story, and how it sheds light on different facets of the Pevensie children. 

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Meet the Editors: Madeline Brzeczek

Hello again! For our second entry to the Meet the Editors series for the Fall semester, we present our prose editor, assistant art and design editor, and copy editor— Madeline Brzeczek. They are excited to be in Jet Fuel Review, and here is some more about them:

Madeline Brzeczek is a senior at Lewis University, majoring in English Studies with minors in Creative Writing and Art with the goal of becoming an author. They are also a tutor at the Lewis Writing Center. Madeline spends most of their time knitting scarves and marathoning bad horror movies with friends, usually at the same time. They collect antique goblets and are a proud parent to many house plants. Their favorite book is Reckless by Cornelia Funke, Madeline’s favorite author and inspiration to start writing. Their favorite genres are fantasy, science fiction, and horror. They prefer the realm of imagination to real life. Madeline enjoys writing short stories and poetry, and was recently published in Lewis Voices and Disquiet Arts literary magazine.

Below is our Q&A with Brzeczek:

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Patiño’s Lores and Myths in Film: The Introduction

Do you like scary stories? The tales that send a wriggling, crawling feeling beneath your skin. The kind that has you skirt the edge of a forest, look under your bed, check the closet and cower beneath the sheets. As strange as it may seem for a species that comes into this world afraid, human beings love to scare each other. And campfire stories tend to be a particular time-honored tradition. What more could you ask for? A dark, chilly night, friends huddled together, the sound of rustling tree branches, chirping crickets and a crackling fire to set the mood. It’s perfect! Those are the types of stories I want to explore.

Image by Pexels by Pixbay

With this blog, I want to look at a specific horror subgenre: folklore. Now, I won’t pretend to be any kind of folklore expert; however, it struck me as the most fascinating in deciding on this blog’s focus. I want to use this space as an opportunity to learn along with you, dear reader. We’ll take this stroll into the shadowy never-ever together! 

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Musings of a Future Librarian: Minor Feelings- An Asian American Reckoning

Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning by Korean poet and essayist Cathy Park Hong, is a novel that consumes readers with the prickling realities of Asian Americans, and the political issues that brought many to the United States. Hong’s familiarity with the essence of poetry can be felt within the details surrounding mental health issues and racist experiences, both of which Hong attributes to the narrow ideals constituting what and who is American. What I find most endearing about this work is the sarcastic tone that develops when Hong or one of her counterparts are forced to tolerate the ignorance minorities often encounter. These moments call one to understand the parallels between Hong’s life and that of the black comedian, Richard Pryor, who night after night, presented the cringe worthy realities of intersectionality between Black and White America. Hong displays this in her choice to include this joke of Pryors, “ I was a kid until I was eight. Then I became a Negro (Hong 38).”

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Christian’s Cinematic Syntax: A Review of “The Cranes Are Flying”

Welcome back, readers. Christian’s Cinematic Syntax is back for the fall semester, and I am excited to share my thoughts on a new batch of films that really caught my attention. Unlike last semester, I will be less strict on what I review, but I will continue selecting based on my world film preference. My “Modern Cinema From Around the World” series was last semester, and now I intend to just publish reviews as their own, without a series attached.  Without further ado, I will begin with the 1957 Palme d’Or winning drama, The Cranes Are Flying

*Spoilers Ahead*

An anti-war film that battled censorship at its release, The Cranes Are Flying focuses on a young couple facing tragedy. Boris (Aleksey Batalov), a factory worker, and Veronika (Tatiana Samoilova), a nurse, are thrust into a harsh reality of life during wartime. Boris volunteers for service, leaving Veronika with a toy squirrel, a birthday gift, and her only memento of him. The couple, now separated, fight their own battles. Veronika resists the romantic advances of Boris’ cousin at home while Boris fights the enemy on the front lines. As the film progresses, these characters change, and tragedy strikes. Veronika and Boris lose the most so the Soviet Union and allied forces can continue on.

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Meet the Editors: Chris J. Patiño

Hello subscribers! The Jet Fuel Review blog returns with its ongoing series, Meet the Editors. Every semester our literary journal gets new staff, and we love introducing them in this way. For our first entry of the semester, we present our newest layout editor, assistant blog editor, and assistant fiction editor. In addition to those titles, he is our newest film blogger under his title, Patiño’s Lores and Myths in Film. If you have the time, peruse his film analysis on The Exorcist (1973).

Chris J. Patiño is a senior at Lewis University, working toward a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism. Inspired at an early age by the late great Roger Ebert, he looks to follow the acclaimed film critic’s footsteps and add his voice to the movie discourse choir. As a Tempo reporter, Chris writes film reviews for The Lewis Flyer. He enjoys just about every film genre, but favorites include horror, sci-fi, and action. A lover of books, board games and the great outdoors, he spends most of his free time in worlds of fantasy and thought. Favorite authors include Stephen King and Jim Butcher, with favorite novels being The Dresden Files series, the Harry Potter series, Salem’s Lot, The Shining, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and All the President’s Men.

Below is our Q&A with Patiño:

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Spangler’s From Sentence to Screen: Brokeback Mountain

Brokeback Mountain is a 2005 romantic drama directed by Ang Lee and stars Heath Ledger, Jake Gyllenhaal, Michelle Williams and Anne Hathaway. The movie starts off in the year 1963, when the main characters Ennis Del Mar (Ledger) and Jack Twist (Gyllenhaal) are hired as sheep herds that summer. Throughout the season they have an amicable relationship, but it isn’t until one night of drinking that their relationship starts. Jack makes a pass at Ennis while they are sharing a tent and initially Ennis is hesitant about the situation, but eventually gives in and the two men have sex. Afterwards, Ennis tells Jack that he isn’t gay, believing that he does not want to have sex with the other man again. Despite this the two end up having a passionate sexual relationship for the remainder of the time they are employed together. It isn’t until after the two men part ways that they realize they had also formed a strong emotional relationship. During their four years apart, Ennis and Jack both end up with wives (Williams & Hathaway) and children, but later the lovers reconnect and start an affair lasting almost 20 years. The film is based on Annie Proulx’s short story of the same name, originally published in The New Yorker on October 13, 1997. In this blog post I will be analyzing the characters of Ennis and Jack between the two mediums; as well as how the beginning and ending of the film is different compared to the original story. 

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Film Feature: Analysis of The Exorcist by Chris J.Patiño–Lighting the Darkness

The Exorcist: Lighting the Darkness” a film analysis by Chris J.Patiño

There are many ways to paint a picture of fear. For some filmmakers, it’s all in the monster, in showcasing the boogeyman at the center of the story. Others rely on suggestion and mind games to get inside peoples’ heads. Whichever way you cut, it’s all theatricality, and presentation goes a long way into how an audience will react. The Exorcist stands as one of the greatest horror films because of the filmmakers’ mastery over the language of film. Perhaps the film’s strongest element is its depiction of demonic possession. Director William Friedkin’s grounded documentary approach lends the film a sense of realism that is uncommon within the genre. He pays careful attention to making sure the world and the people in it feel authentic and believable. But that does not mean the film lacks artistry. As it happens, it’s the combination of the real with the imaginary that sells the film’s realistic vibe and accentuates the horror of it all. Of the filmmakers’ many technical wizardries, the cinematography, specifically the lighting, captures the character’s internal landscapes of fear as they contend with great evil. It lends to the film’s overall themes of faith and uncertainty. In The Exorcist, expressionistic lighting is tied directly to the human psyche, portraying the inner turmoil of doubt in the face of evil.

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New Artwork by Lizzy Lunday!

Lizzy Lunday’s work appears in Jet Fuel Review’s Issue #19! Check it out here!

LA Hot Tub

Lizzy Lunday (b.1992) is a visual artist based in Brooklyn, NY. Lunday received her MFA from Pratt Institute In 2019, during which she was the recipient of Pratt’s GSEF grant. Her work has been exhibited both nationally and internationally, including her two-woman exhibition Feminine Constructs in 2018 and Origins in 2019. Most recently, Lunday was named on Saatchi Art’s 2019 Rising Stars Report and was an artist in residence at 77Art in Rutland, Vermont.

Artist Statement
The foundations of my paintings are composed of images that I take during my everyday life, pulling from television, social media, and my physical environment. Working in modes of both representation and mutation, I use paint to meld images together, creating fractured and distorted realities. Through the manipulation of these images, my work touches on themes of gender, intimacy, consumerism, and power.