Dominique Dusek

Dominique Dusek

Welcome back, readers! In today’s installment of Meet the Editors, we’re going to meet Dominique Dusek, our Submissions Editors and Assistant Marketing and Development Editor.  In addition to working on Jet Fuel, Dominique actively participates in Sigma Tau Delta, the national English honor Society, and shares her love of writing with the Lewis community as a tutor at the campus writing center. A consummate English nerd, she spends most of her free time if not reading and writing, binge-watching episodes of Sherlock on Netflix, jamming out to Frankie Valli, and riding her horse.

Who are you and what is your role in the Jet Fuel Review?

My name is Dominique Dusek. I’m a senior English Major at Lewis University with a special interest in creative and professional writing and I am currently fulfilling the roles of Marketing and Development Assistant and Submissions Manager for the JFR.

What book might we find on your nightstand right now?

I am currently enmeshed in a book called The Lolita Effect which explores the idea of young women’s sexuality and how it is shaped by the media. So far, it has been pretty interesting and insightful and I would highly recommend it.

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othello 1

Photo from Wikimedia

Similar to A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the opening of Othello pits a disapproving parent against a couple so in love they must elope in secrecy. However, any similarities between Othello and a conventional comedy end there.

Best understood as the intimate portrait of a marriage wrecked by jealous insecurity, Othello resonates as a poignant tragedy illustrating how distrustfulness ultimately leads to self-destruction.  Throughout the story, Shakespeare plays with the audience’s expectations by employing ample foreshadowing to suggest the tragic fall of the titular character. One of the most important instances of this is the implied role of magic in the coercion of Desdemona to elope with “the Moor.”

After hearing his daughter has eloped with his comrade, Brabantio, in utter shock and disgust, issues the allegation that the Moor must have persuaded her to elope under the coercion of magic or spells. He claims his daughter has been stolen from him, abused, “and corrupted by spells and medicines bought of mountebanks; for nature so preposterously to err, being not deficient, blind or lame of sense, sans witchcraft could not” (1.3.62-66).

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Photo from cloudfront.net

Photo from cloudfront.net

There are some films that are meant to be watched at certain times of the year. Halloween is nearly upon us, and I’m sure there will be many a viewing party for Hocus Pocus, Friday the 13th, and of course, Halloween. At Thanksgiving, we’ll all watch Planes, Trains, and Automobiles, and on Christmas, we’ll all watch It’s a Wonderful Life. But there are some films, at least for me, that became associated with a certain time of year for almost no conceivable reason. This weekend, my sister and I sat down to watch a movie that has become a fall favorite for us: When Harry Met Sally.

There is absolutely no reason that When Harry Met Sally should be associated with the fall. The film takes place over a period of several years, and depicts every season at some point during the story. Nothing terribly important to the plot is tied to the fall. In fact, some of the film’s most important, climactic moments occur on New Year’s Eve. But we don’t feel compelled to watch this movie on New Year’s Eve, or in the summer, or at any time of the year other than fall. Why?

Honestly, I don’t really know. My best guess is that the DVD box art–a shot from a particular scene in the film when Harry and Sally are walking through a park in the fall, many-colored leaves falling all around them–may have subconsciously become the iconic representation of the film for my sister and me. It probably also has everything to do with our mutual love of fall as a season. If a person hates fall, they may not associate this movie with fall. Unless they hate the movie, in which case they’re a terrible person, and not to be dealt with.

Also, this is a romantic comedy, and fall is just cuddle weather. Y’know? It’s cool and crisp, and there are hoodies and warm drinks and pumpkin spice. That can’t be just me.

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Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon are the pioneers in home entertainment today. They have almost instantly created a new culture of binge watching movies and TV. It is clear that they have revolutionized how the masses consume media. Today, we are on the front line of a major change in our culture. Now, word has it that HBO is joining the race and that Netflix is fighting to redefine home theater.

Photo from pbs.twimg.com

Photo from pbs.twimg.com

Netflix is the hipster of the bunch, being that it first popularized the new format of movie and TV watching. Back in the day, HBO set the bar by asking for an additional charge to add its network to your cable package. Just when everyone thought HBO was a thing of the past, they started to up the ante with television shows filmed like movies. Now they have announced that they will offer their service a la carte, or separately from cable packages.

This means that despite cable providers struggling to stay relevant, HBO has decided to join Netflix in the fight to be independent. This has been a major issue lately. Cable companies do not want streaming services to succeed. Cable providers rely on cable packages to sell networks that no one would pay to see if given the chance. The other big issue is that this gives people the opportunity to see new movies at home relatively early.

Netflix is one step ahead of HBO in the fight to claim movies. While Netflix does not always have the newest movies like HBO, they are starting to break ground in a different way. Netflix has managed to secure a few exclusive movie deals. Firstly, it has announced that the sequel to the movie Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon will premiere on its site in streaming format. The movie will be on Netflix the same day it hits IMAX theaters. The other major deal it made was to secure four movies with Adam Sandler. These movies will be exclusive to Netflix and will not be shown in theaters.

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Welcome, blog readers, to another installment of our Pick-a-Poem feature! In the middle of each week, we feature a new poem here on the blog. Consider this your mid-week poetry break, and hopefully you’ll discover a new poet whose work you’ll explore further. As always, the featured poem is found via Poetry Daily, which is a great site for finding new poetry. This week we feature Sonnet for the Misbegotten by Jill Bialosky.

According to her website, Jill Bialosky is the author of several collections of poetry, including Subterranean (2001) and The End of Desire (1997). She is also the author of the novel House Under Snow (2002) and The Life Room (2007). Her poems and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, The Nation, The New Republic, Kenyon Review, and others. She is currently an editor at W.W. Norton & Company and lives in New York City.

Sonnet for the Misbegotten by Jill Bialosky

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Photo from Goodreads

Photo from Goodreads

Hello Readers, and welcome back to Sabrina’s Book Corner. This week we will be talking about The Girl in the Steel Corset by Kady Cross. This book, in my humble opinion, is a cross between the X-Men and Jekyll and Hyde.

Set in England in 1897,  this story’s main character, Finley, is a little strange. Finley has a dark side and it gives her speed and more strength than a fully grown man. When her employer’s son tries to take advantage of Finley, she fights back and wins, but she runs away fearing what her dark side has gotten her into.

While on the run, Finley quite literally runs into Griffin King, an orphaned duke. Griffin takes her in and shares a little secret with Finley–he has talents himself and he’s not the only one. Griffin also fights evil in the service of the English crown. Right now he is taking on an evil that might be bigger than he can handle.

Dark sides, strange talents, and mystery–The Girl in the Steel Corset has it all. This supernatural mystery has something for everyone to enjoy. It captured my attention on the first page and I couldn’t put it down. Kady Cross splices together the worlds of Jekyll and Hyde and the X-Men to make this page-turning mystery that you just can’t put down.

That’s all for now! Check back in next time and remember to keep reading.

– Sabrina Parr, Poetry Editor

pen

Photo from gennasarnak.com

This month of October—which begins with Dashain in Nepal and ends with Samhain among the Celts, which sees the conclusion of National Hispanic Month and the start of German Heritage Month and includes Indigenous and Italian and Polish Heritage celebrations, as well as the Independence Days of Cyprus and Portugal, Nigeria and Turkey, Turkmenistan and the Grenadines, with the birthday of Ghandi on the 2nd, Lief Erikson Day on the 9th, and Thanksgiving Day in Canada on the 12th–seems a fitting time to encourage JFR blog readers (and everyone) to explore the global vastness of poetry—itself the oldest and most universal genre. I’m also prompted to propose such an exploration because my father called me the other night to ask if I knew anything of the poetry of the Bible and why it didn’t rhyme. Finally, I thought, he’s glad I was an English major and became a poet!

Similarly, in my Native American literature class, I recently introduced students to the basic elements of all good poetry (rhythm, repetition, and imagery)—something I introduce in every literature course I teach—and always there’s a question about the assumed requirement of rhyme, especially for poetry in English.

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